• Users Online: 63
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 132-134

Bombay and Lewis phenotype testing in correlation with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II: The blood bank's role in diagnosis


Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City-CR, Ministry of National Guard, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Ahmed Maded Al Harbi
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Abdullah Specialist Children Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City-CR, Ministry of National Guard, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/joah.joah_85_19

Rights and Permissions

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II (LAD II) is a rare hereditary disorder caused by the mutation in the guanosine diphosphate-fucose transporter gene (SLC35C1). LAD II is characterized by inexpression of ABO antigens (i.e., Bombay phenotype) and the lack of Lewis red blood cell (RBC) antigens. In addition to high neutrophil counts, patients also manifest recurrent infections with developmental delays and stunted growth. Blood bank laboratory tests such as blood grouping, RBC phenotyping, antibody screening and identification of the nature of the antibody were conducted in order to confirm the consequences associated with this gene anomaly in this case report. Type and screen results initially identified the patient as group “O” Rh positive with pan-reactive antibody screening cells and identification panel cells. The patient plasma showed significant incompatibility to all O-positive donors' RBCs. The patient's RBCs were tested against anti-H lectin and Lewis (Lea, Leb) typing antisera and showed no reaction, which meant that the patient does not express neither Lewis antigens nor H antigen on his red cell. The presence of anti-H (in a Bombay phenotype individual) explained the reactivity to reagent red cells and crossmatched incompatibility of Group O units as these cells naturally contained the H antigen.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed576    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded45    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal