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IMAGE IN HEMATOLOGY
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 119

Gingival hypertrophy does not always mean leukemia


Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication30-Sep-2014

Correspondence Address:
Abdulkareem Almomen
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-5127.142008

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How to cite this article:
Farhan S, Afzal A, Al Khaledy O, Almomen A. Gingival hypertrophy does not always mean leukemia. J Appl Hematol 2014;5:119

How to cite this URL:
Farhan S, Afzal A, Al Khaledy O, Almomen A. Gingival hypertrophy does not always mean leukemia. J Appl Hematol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Oct 30];5:119. Available from: https://www.jahjournal.org/text.asp?2014/5/3/119/142008

A 47-year-old woman referred to our out-patient Department of Hematology with main complaint of progressive, painless upper gingival hypertrophy with mild gum bleeding and difficulty in chewing food for 2 months. She had no history of fever or weight loss. She was known to have hypothyroidism and Vitamin B12 deficiency for 5 years on replacement therapy with thyroxin and Vitamin B12. Her past medical history was unremarkable. Vital signs were normal and Physical examination showed upper gingival hypertrophy with embeds teeth of the upper maxillary arch [Figure 1]. The lower gum and teeth were normal. She had no goiter, skin lesions, lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. The laboratory investigations, including complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood film, lactate dehydrogenase, liver and kidney functions, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile, ferritin, Vitamin B12, Vitamin B6, Vitamin D, and autoimmune workup were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, orbits, ears, and paranasal sinuses was normal. An upper gingival biopsy was taken, and the histopathology report was consistent with irritation fibroma causing gingival hyperplasia [Figure 2].
Figure 1: Upper gingival hyperplasia

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Figure 2: Histopathology of upper gingival biopsy showing irritation fibroma causing gingival

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    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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