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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 75-76

Donor registration management using blood bank information system: Added layer to safe blood in developing country


Department of Transfusion Medicine, BL Kapur Super Speciality Hospital, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication18-Jun-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mitu Dogra
Department of Transfusion Medicine, BL Kapur Super Speciality Hospital, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/joah.joah_74_17

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How to cite this article:
Setia RD, Dogra M, Handoo A, Sachdeva P. Donor registration management using blood bank information system: Added layer to safe blood in developing country. J Appl Hematol 2018;9:75-6

How to cite this URL:
Setia RD, Dogra M, Handoo A, Sachdeva P. Donor registration management using blood bank information system: Added layer to safe blood in developing country. J Appl Hematol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Dec 6];9:75-6. Available from: http://www.jahjournal.org/text.asp?2018/9/2/75/234556

Transfusion of blood and blood products, although being a life-saving measure still has far-reaching consequences as far as the morbidity and mortality resulting from the transfusion of infected blood is concerned. India has about 2760 licensed blood centers [1] including both the private and the government centers. Transfusion services in India are fragmented, and the quality standards are also variably implemented; moreover, there is lack of standardization of screening procedures among the multitude of blood collection centers.[2] Although advanced testing platforms have increased blood safety multifold good donor screening still plays an important role. Many blood banks are maintaining manual records of donors making donor authentication and donor filtration based on the past eligibility records challenging. A robust blood bank information system (BIS) can help identify a previously reactive blood donor at the time of donor registration.

A replacement blood donor presented in our department in November 2015 for blood donation. The blood collected was tested for transfusion-transmitted infections on i1000SR Architect plus from Abbott and nucleic acid test (NAT) is done by Cobas TaqScreen multiplex test on Cobas s 201 system based on real-time polymerase chain reaction. The sample was found to be reactive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and NAT nonreactive. Despite numerous attempts to recall the donor for counseling the donor did not respond. The same donor again came to our blood bank in February 2017 for blood donation. The hospital information system being used in our hospital had recently undergone a version change, and our previous deferrals in the system could not be carried forwarded to the new system. As per donor, he had donated blood in our blood bank 12 months back. We manually checked the records for the past 1 year, but we found no records and proceeded for blood donation. This time he was seroreactive for HCV and hepatitis B virus) (HBV reactive on NAT. IT was approached to check for any records of this donor on our previous BIS system. IT revealed that he had donated blood at our center 15 months back and was HCV seroreactive. On donor notification, he again did not respond to our calls.

Despite mandatory HBsAg screening, HBV is still the most frequent cause of posttransfusion hepatitis in India.[3] Given the high seropositivity rate of HIV, HBV, and HCV in India, a combination of screening with HBsAg and antibody to core antigen or NAT is desirable. Furthermore, there is need of a robust blood BIS either independent or integrated with the hospital information system. BIS is easy to use and eliminates transcriptional errors. Last year (2015–2016) with the help of previous BIS, we successfully picked 6 out of 261 (2.29%) permanently deferred donors attempting to donate again.

We have centralized hemovigilance program to identify adverse donor reaction and adverse transfusion reaction; it is suggested to include permanently deferred donors in this program. Switching over to a good blood BIS and integrating them to a centralized donor registry and identification of permanently deferred donors in hemovigilance program of the country to enhance blood safety is the need of the hour in India.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Central drug standard control organisation statewise list of licensed blood banks in India February 2015. Available from :http://www.cdsco.nic.in/html/bloodlist/html. [Last assessed on 2018 May].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Kapoor D, Saxena R, Sood B, Sarin SK. Blood transfusion practices in India: Results of a national survey. Indian J Gastroenterol 2000;19:64-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
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3.
Chaudhuri V, Nanu A, Panda SK, Chand P. Evaluation of serologic screening of blood donors in India reveals a lack of correlation between anti-HBc titer and PCR-amplified HBV DNA. Transfusion 2003;43:1442-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
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